Anthony Seidman reviews “The End of the Trial of Man”

“Readers familiar with such long masterpieces by Stubbs as Ex Nihilo have become familiar with the taut and searing intelligence in his poetry. His poems often appear in open sequences or long pieces, and the characteristics they share most with each other is the same piercing intelligence that examines a question or obsession from multiple … Continue reading

The End of the Trial of Man

* * “No one is writing like this, or quite like this, or not that I have read recently in the English tongue.” —Stephen Romer   In this new collection of poems, Paul Stubbs re-imagines a future age of metaphysics, philosophy and post-religious terror; with the tutelary spirit of Francis Bacon hovering above each poem, his paintings … Continue reading

The Return to Silence — An Essay on Friedrich Hölderlin (excerpt)

*‘That when the silence returns there shall be a language too.’ * ‘The end of speech could arrive on the day when everybody feels as theologically posthumous as Friedrich Hölderlin did, or when we, the only defensible illusions of his lost syntactically fatherland, come to feel as truncated by his voice as he did by … Continue reading

3 poems published in ‘Les Carnets d’Eucharis’

Imagining a Body, Afterworldsmen and Death of Utopia have been published along their French translation (by Blandine Longre) in issue 2 of the French poetry magazine Les Carnets d’Eucharis (2014 – editor Nathalie Riera). * Various reviews about this issue: http://www.recoursaupoeme.fr/revue-des-revues/les-carnets-deucharis-version-papier-opus-2/m-c-masset http://pierresel.typepad.fr/la-pierre-et-le-sel/2014/05/les-carnets-deucharis-carnet-2-2014.html http://www.sitaudis.fr/Parutions/les-carnets-d-eucharis-carnet-deux.php  

‘The Glorious Falsehood of Progress’ – An essay about Émile Verhaeren’s Poems

By Paul Stubbs * Poems Émile Verhaeren Translated and selected by Will Stone Arc Publications, 2014  * ‘We substitute one ghost for another, that the fables of the golden age are well worth the eternal present we dream of, and that the original ego, basis of our hopes, evokes the void and ultimately reduces itself … Continue reading

‘The Boundaries of Being’ – about W.S. Graham’s poetry (excerpt)

* Afterword first published, along with its French translation, in Les Dialogues obscurs / The Dark Dialogues, Selected poems / poèmes choisis, by W. S Graham (translated from the English by Anne-Sylvie Homassel & Blandine Longre, Introduction by Michael Snow / Afterword by Paul Stubbs – bilingual book, Black Herald Press, 2013, ISBN  978-2-919582-07-5) * “It is to be hoped that this … Continue reading

THE BLACK HERALD 3 – EDITORIAL (EXCERPT)

First published in The Black Herald, issue 3 (Sept. 2012) by Paul Stubbs * On January 15th, 1967, in one of a series of letters exchanged between the poets W.H. Auden and Michael Hamburger concerning the translations of German poet Friedrich Hölderlin, Auden wrote that he was trying ‘to account for what I’m sure you’ll … Continue reading

‘The Perspicacity of Repetition’: Heller Levinson’s Hinge Theory – an essay by Paul Stubbs

* The Perspicacity of Repetition (The Birth of Hinge Theory) * Books by Heller Levinson Smelling Mary, Howling Dog Press, 2008 From Stone This Running, Black Widow Press, 2011 Hinge Trio, (with Linda Lynch and Felino A. Soriano), La Alameda Press, 2012  * To enrich the latent possibilities of poetry by undermining it, adding to the … Continue reading

‘A Wonderful Thing’ – a review of ‘FLESH’ (Stride magazine)

‘Challenging concepts, developed into a project-length exploration. A rarity in contemporary poetry; even the experimental scene is patchier in these than it should be. Paul Stubbs’ poetry is full of such ambition – pursued with a terrifying metaphysical and theological energy. It comes from an almost forgotten (and intensely unfashionable) idea of poetry as the threshold, … Continue reading

Flesh (a long poem)

Flesh Paul Stubbs introduction by Ingrid Soren Black Herald Press, 20 May 2013 130×170 – 54 pages – 10 € / £ 8.50 / $13 ISBN  978-2-919582-05-1 Order the book / Commander l’ouvrage ‘Stubbs is no slave to conditioning or convention: inventor as well as seer, and ignoring regulation, he stands far off looking over time and … Continue reading

‘After the Flood’

A poem by Paul Stubbs, published in Poetry Salzburg Review, No 12 – Autumn 2007, is now available online, in the Poetry Library‘s free access non-profit-making online archive of English 20th and 21st century poetry magazines. * “And as the one last species gasps Its last, and the clouds like paper-bags implode, our soothsayers they get … Continue reading

Interview with Paul Stubbs by Greer Mansfield in Bookslut, October 2012

Interview with Paul Stubbs by Greer Mansfield in Bookslut, October 2012   “In addition to editing a quality literary magazine and publishing interesting writers new and old, Stubbs happens to be one of our day’s most striking and original English-language poets. His poems are metaphysical but visceral; they are often written in a jagged syntax, … Continue reading

‘The Eternal Procession’ – On ‘The Arrière-Pays’ by Yves Bonnefoy (excerpt)

THE ARRIÈRE-PAYS Yves Bonnefoy Introduced and translated from the French by Stephen Romer (Seagull Books, 2012)  * Yves Bonnefoy is first an abstract form, then a poet. Therefore a work such as The Arrière–pays is but a shadow giving notice of his shapes still to locate a sundial. He is what Jean-Paul Sartre said of … Continue reading

‘Cacophony of tongues’ – Paul Stubbs reviews ‘Liminal’ by Michael Lee Rattigan

LIMINAL Michael Lee Rattigan (Rufus books, September 2012)  ** ‘Poetry’, wrote Octavio Paz, ‘is the other voice. Not the voice of history or of anti-history, but the voice which, in history, is always saying something different’. He was of course talking of what is re-created in silence, beyond History and of what governs its conversations … Continue reading

The Black Herald, issue 3

The Black Herald Literary magazine – Revue de littérature Issue #3 – September 2012 – Septembre 2012 190 pages – 15€ / £13 / $19 – ISBN 978-2-919582-04-4 Poetry, short fiction, prose, essays, translations. Poésie, fiction courte, prose, essais, traductions. With / avec W.S Graham, Gregory Corso, Andrew Fentham, Louis Calaferte, Iain Britton, Jos Roy, Tristan Corbière, Michael … Continue reading

Particles of Truth – Paul Stubbs reviews ‘Of Flies and Monkeys’ by Jacques Dupin

* Of Flies and Monkeys Jacques Dupin Introduced and translated from the French by John Taylor (Bitter Oleander Press 2011) * In 1871 in Charleville when Rimbaud, preparing to decimate two thousand years of poetical ‘tradition’, sat down to write his ‘letter of the seer’ to Paul Demeny, he was about to include, among other … Continue reading

THE BLACK HERALD 2 – EDITORIAL (EXCERPT)

by Paul Stubbs (first published in The Black Herald, issue 2, September 2011) “What will be required to make this happen is, among others, an end to the ‘creative classroom’ (this Anglo-Saxon invention—while a rarity in the major cities of Europe—was a trend started in the USA that then moved on to become a profitable plague … Continue reading

The defeat of time – Paul Stubbs reviews “Quartet for the End of Time”

* Quartet for the End of Time Mark Wilson Editions du Zaporogue, 2011 a review by Paul Stubbs * In the period after the First World War Ezra Pound reached the conclusion that England as a central core-place of the creative arts was over, had become in fact “uninhabitable”. This was the moment of not … Continue reading

The Black Herald 1 – Editorial (excerpt)

by Paul Stubbs (first published in The Black Herald, issue 1, January 2011) On July 2nd, 1914, the inaugural issue of Blast magazine was published in England, a project begun by the writer Wyndham Lewis, who hoped it would cement the reputation of the new ‘Vorticist’ movement – an English-speaking response to the new Italian avant-garde and … Continue reading

MATT SIMPSON’s review of THE THEOLOGICAL MUSEUM (May 2005)

MATT SIMPSON’s review of THE THEOLOGICAL MUSEUM by Paul Stubbs (Flambard Press) (published in Critical Survey, May 2005) Stubbs is another kettle of fish. You need to read him with the sort of intelligent attentiveness you bring to a reading, say, of Donne. The Theological Museum is an astonishing debut. I have to admit, however, that, … Continue reading