Alice Oswald reviews “The End of the Trial of Man”

* “For nearly two decades (or perhaps millennia) Paul Stubbs has been engaged in the task of imagining what lies beyond the imagination. (…) There is no guardrail to this kind of project, no literary guide or physical limit, only exploration. The extraordinary thing about the poems in The End of the Trial of Man, … Continue reading

Anthony Seidman reviews “The End of the Trial of Man”

“Readers familiar with such long masterpieces by Stubbs as Ex Nihilo have become familiar with the taut and searing intelligence in his poetry. His poems often appear in open sequences or long pieces, and the characteristics they share most with each other is the same piercing intelligence that examines a question or obsession from multiple … Continue reading

PAUL STUBBS INTERVIEWED BY PAUL SUTTON (Stride magazine, Feb. 2015)

“Unique is a devalued term, especially in poetry. We’re drowning in unique voices, doing identical things. Paul Stubbs is the only English poet I think the term applies to. His work shows no interest in anything, except the poetic imagination. How it exists, and coexists, with his inner religious landscape. And what future his imagination can … Continue reading

The Return to Silence — An Essay on Friedrich Hölderlin (excerpt)

*‘That when the silence returns there shall be a language too.’ * ‘The end of speech could arrive on the day when everybody feels as theologically posthumous as Friedrich Hölderlin did, or when we, the only defensible illusions of his lost syntactically fatherland, come to feel as truncated by his voice as he did by … Continue reading

‘The Glorious Falsehood of Progress’ – An essay about Émile Verhaeren’s Poems

By Paul Stubbs * Poems Émile Verhaeren Translated and selected by Will Stone Arc Publications, 2014  * ‘We substitute one ghost for another, that the fables of the golden age are well worth the eternal present we dream of, and that the original ego, basis of our hopes, evokes the void and ultimately reduces itself … Continue reading

‘The Perspicacity of Repetition’: Heller Levinson’s Hinge Theory – an essay by Paul Stubbs

* The Perspicacity of Repetition (The Birth of Hinge Theory) * Books by Heller Levinson Smelling Mary, Howling Dog Press, 2008 From Stone This Running, Black Widow Press, 2011 Hinge Trio, (with Linda Lynch and Felino A. Soriano), La Alameda Press, 2012  * To enrich the latent possibilities of poetry by undermining it, adding to the … Continue reading

‘A Wonderful Thing’ – a review of ‘FLESH’ (Stride magazine)

‘Challenging concepts, developed into a project-length exploration. A rarity in contemporary poetry; even the experimental scene is patchier in these than it should be. Paul Stubbs’ poetry is full of such ambition – pursued with a terrifying metaphysical and theological energy. It comes from an almost forgotten (and intensely unfashionable) idea of poetry as the threshold, … Continue reading

‘The Joy and Misery of Solitude’ – Paul Stubbs reviews ‘Rilke in Paris’ by Maurice Betz

* * The Joy and Misery of Solitude  * RILKE IN PARIS Maurice Betz Translated from the French by Will Stone, Hesperus Press, 2012  *  * Rilke, on earth, lived a life akin to a pre-natal being, one whose sensations in existence remained as homogenous and pure as his time spent in the womb. He … Continue reading

Interview with Paul Stubbs by Greer Mansfield in Bookslut, October 2012

Interview with Paul Stubbs by Greer Mansfield in Bookslut, October 2012   “In addition to editing a quality literary magazine and publishing interesting writers new and old, Stubbs happens to be one of our day’s most striking and original English-language poets. His poems are metaphysical but visceral; they are often written in a jagged syntax, … Continue reading

‘The Eternal Procession’ – On ‘The Arrière-Pays’ by Yves Bonnefoy (excerpt)

THE ARRIÈRE-PAYS Yves Bonnefoy Introduced and translated from the French by Stephen Romer (Seagull Books, 2012)  * Yves Bonnefoy is first an abstract form, then a poet. Therefore a work such as The Arrière–pays is but a shadow giving notice of his shapes still to locate a sundial. He is what Jean-Paul Sartre said of … Continue reading

‘Cacophony of tongues’ – Paul Stubbs reviews ‘Liminal’ by Michael Lee Rattigan

LIMINAL Michael Lee Rattigan (Rufus books, September 2012)  ** ‘Poetry’, wrote Octavio Paz, ‘is the other voice. Not the voice of history or of anti-history, but the voice which, in history, is always saying something different’. He was of course talking of what is re-created in silence, beyond History and of what governs its conversations … Continue reading

Particles of Truth – Paul Stubbs reviews ‘Of Flies and Monkeys’ by Jacques Dupin

* Of Flies and Monkeys Jacques Dupin Introduced and translated from the French by John Taylor (Bitter Oleander Press 2011) * In 1871 in Charleville when Rimbaud, preparing to decimate two thousand years of poetical ‘tradition’, sat down to write his ‘letter of the seer’ to Paul Demeny, he was about to include, among other … Continue reading

The defeat of time – Paul Stubbs reviews “Quartet for the End of Time”

* Quartet for the End of Time Mark Wilson Editions du Zaporogue, 2011 a review by Paul Stubbs * In the period after the First World War Ezra Pound reached the conclusion that England as a central core-place of the creative arts was over, had become in fact “uninhabitable”. This was the moment of not … Continue reading

MATT SIMPSON’s review of THE THEOLOGICAL MUSEUM (May 2005)

MATT SIMPSON’s review of THE THEOLOGICAL MUSEUM by Paul Stubbs (Flambard Press) (published in Critical Survey, May 2005) Stubbs is another kettle of fish. You need to read him with the sort of intelligent attentiveness you bring to a reading, say, of Donne. The Theological Museum is an astonishing debut. I have to admit, however, that, … Continue reading

Already in front of you and far behind (Will Stone about ‘The Icon Maker’)

Will Stone about The Icon Maker by Paul Stubbs (Arc Publications) On arriving in Paris from the provinces and clearly faced with no other plausible reaction, Arthur Rimbaud urinated on the manuscripts of establishment poetasters and summarily destroyed the ‘poetic’ Parisian lodgings the Parnassians had provided for him. In our own era, where endless droves of … Continue reading

Let’s Get Visceral… (Nigel Parke about Ex Nihilo)

a review of Paul Stubbs’s Ex Nihilo by Nigel Parke (October 2010) I am in receipt of two volumes of poetry from the newly formed Black Herald Press. Blandine Longre and Paul Stubbs have taken the bold step into publishing and have begun by publishing their own recent work. I am yet to read Blandine Longre’s Clarities, though … Continue reading

The Meaning-Making Machine

Theoretical Animals Gary J. Shipley (BlazeVOX Books, 2010) In 1959 in Paris when William Burroughs and Brion Gysin, following in Tristan Tzara’s footsteps, started in earnest to construct the ‘cut-ups’, they began the nominal process of reducing ‘conventional’ prose back down into the retinal-rush of the newsreel, the slogan, the hideously disgorged and fractious sentence, … Continue reading

Thus Spoke Zarathustra (Mark Wilson about Ex Nihilo)

by Mark Wilson Review published in 3:AM magazine, Wednesday, March 30th, 2011. The poetry of Paul Stubbs is like a severe volcanic eruption within the landscape of British poetry. In fact, to say that this small corpus of work (as to date, three books) is part of ‘British poetry’ seems a massive perversion of terminology. … Continue reading

Rimbaud and the New Inquisition

an essay by Paul Stubbs, first published in The Black Herald, issue 2 – September 2011 The German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche in arguing that the Western world was essentially dominated by the so-called ‘last people’—those who, without the arrow of propulsive time, saw only the pointless drudgery of repetition—could well have been paving the way … Continue reading

The Vortex of Being

* CLARITIES Blandine Longre (Black Herald Press, 2010) * By Paul Stubbs * The word ‘metaphysics’ derives from the Greek words (metà) (‘beyond’ or ‘after’) and (physikà) (‘physics’), all of which went into the creation of Aristotle’s books on physics. But the term soon came to be questioned by Latin scholiasts who deemed it to … Continue reading